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SPECIAL INTEREST PROGRAM

Monday Morning

9:30–10:45 a.m.


SIP 1
Additive Machines, Capabilities and Processes


Program Organizers:
Joseph Capone, Ametek, Inc.
Stuart Jackson, Renishaw Inc.
Aaron LaLonde, SLM Solutions NA, Inc.






This program will consider the rapidly growing topic of additive manufacturing (AM) and aims to cover information relevant to the powder metal industry. Presentations will discuss the technologies of current interest in AM and highlight the value and advantages of the different processes and machines. Additional information to be shared includes identification of suitable applications and business case information to support use cases. The current state of AM will be shared, including industry activity, challenges, and ongoing developments to promote and enable manufacturing and industrialization of AM.

Session Chairman: Aaron LaLonde, SLM Solutions NA, Inc.

191

USA

9:30 a.m.

Additive Manufacturing for Growth Acceleration in the Powder Metallurgy Industry
Kirk Rogers,
The Barnes Group Advisors

203

USA

9:55 a.m.

Developing of Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) and Heat-Treated Cycles for 3D-Printed Aerospace Titanium
Donald Godfrey,
Honeywell Aerospace

204

USA

10:20 a.m.

Process Maps for Powder Bed Fusion Based on Defect Densities
Jerard V. Gordon,
Carnegie Mellon University

 

SPECIAL INTEREST PROGRAM

Tuesday Morning

8:00–9:15 a.m.


SIP 2-1
Powder Production for AM, PM, MIM: Differences, Similarities and Synergies


Program Organizers:
Carl Blaise, Laval University
Gilles L'Esperance, FAPMI,
Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal







The emergence of metal additive manufacturing (AM) and its numerous technologies has created a demand for metal powders with specific characteristics such as particle size distribution, particle morphology, chemical composition, and cost. These requirements are not exactly new and other processes relying on metal powders, such as conventional powder metallurgy (PM) and metal injection molding (MIM), have similar requirements. Presentations will include insightful analyses of metal powders manufactured by different techniques utilized by the PM, MIM and AM industry.

Session Chairman: Denis Christopherson, Federal-Mogul Sintered Products

192

USA

8:00 a.m.

Improved Production Methods for Powders Used in Additive Manufacturing
Christopher Schade,
Hoeganaes Corporation

193

USA

8:25 a.m.

The Effect of Production Process Route on Metal Powder Properties
Roland T. Warzel, III,
North American Hoganas Co.

194

Canada

8:50 a.m.

Water-Atomized Metal Powders for PM, AM and MIM: Improvements and Potential Markets
Chantal Labrecque,
Rio Tinto Metal Powders

 

SPECIAL INTEREST PROGRAM

Tuesday Morning

10:30–11:45 a.m.


SIP 2-2
Powder Production for AM, PM, MIM: Moving Away from Two-Fluid Atomization


Program Organizers:
Carl Blaise, Laval University
Gilles L'Esperance, FAPMI, 
Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal







The emergence of metal additive manufacturing (AM) and its numerous technologies has created a demand for metal powders with specific characteristics such as particle size distribution, particle morphology, chemical composition, and cost. These requirements are not exactly new and other processes relying on metal powders, such as conventional powder metallurgy (PM) and metal injection molding (MIM), have similar requirements. Presentations will include insightful analyses of metal powders manufactured by different techniques utilized by the PM, MIM and AM industry.

Session Chairman: Gilles L’Esperance, FAPMI, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal

195

Canada

10:30 a.m.

Powder Production and Characterization Methods for AM
Jérôme Pollak,
Tekna Advanced Materials

196

Canada

10:55 a.m.

Solving AM Challenges with Plasma Atomization
Frédéric Marion,
AP&C

197

Canada

11:20 a.m.

Description of Various Additive Manufacturing Applications Made with Powders Produced with a Proprietary Atomizing Technology
Amir Nobari,
5N Plus Micro Powders

 

SPECIAL INTEREST PROGRAM

Tuesday Afternoon

3:15–4:35 p.m.


SIP 2-3
Powder Production for AM, PM, MIM: Process Characterization and Design


Program Organizers:
Carl Blaise, Laval University
Gilles L'Esperance, FAPMI, 
Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal







The emergence of metal additive manufacturing (AM) and its numerous technologies has created a demand for metal powders with specific characteristics such as particle size distribution, particle morphology, chemical composition, and cost. These requirements are not exactly new and other processes relying on metal powders, such as conventional powder metallurgy (PM) and metal injection molding (MIM), have similar requirements. Presentations will include insightful analyses of metal powders manufactured by different techniques utilized by the PM, MIM, and AM industry.

Session Chairman: Carl Blais, Laval University

198

USA

3:15 p.m.

Process Influence on Non-Ferrous Metal Powders
Thomas W. Pelletiers,
Kymera International

199

USA

3:40 p.m.

Industrial Gas Atomization for Additive Manufacturing and Beyond
John Meyer,
Carpenter Technology Corporation

062

USA

4:05 p.m.

Development of Effective Tools for Precise Selection of Atomization parameters to Optimize Powder Production
Jordan A. Tiarks,
Ames Laboratory (USDOE)

 

SPECIAL INTEREST PROGRAM

Wednesday Morning

8:00–9:15 a.m.


SIP 3-1
Machinery Sensors and Information Technology: Industry Sensors I—I'm Looking for Data


Program Organizers:
Thomas W. Pelletiers, Kymera International
Blaine Stebick, Phoenix Sintered Metals LLC
William R. Gasbarre, FAPMI, Gasbarre Products, Inc.
Daniel P. Reardon, Abbott Furnace Company







The ability to control processes is directly related to monitoring the variables driving the process. In PM, temperature, velocity, flow, position, pressure, and force are all examples of data critical to the quality of product produced. Developments in sensors monitoring and controlling various processes in the PM industry are explored defining current state-of-the-art, emerging new technology, and the architecture used to deliver this data to enterprise wide information systems. Combining the data can enable real time decisions improving quality, efficiency, accuracy, and delivery.

Session Chairman: Thomas W. Pelletiers, Kymera International

181

USA

9:30 a.m.

Sensors Related to Sintering
Dustin Yetzer,
Abbott Furnace Company

026

USA

8:25 a.m.

Quality Monitoring in the Overall Manufacturing Process Using Acoustic Resonance
Bryan Butsch,
The Modal Shop, Inc.

189

USA

8:50 a.m.

3D Measurement and Inspection
Christopher Wirth,
Keyence

 

SPECIAL INTEREST PROGRAM

Wednesday Morning

9:30–10:45 a.m.


SIP 3-2
Machinery Sensors and Information Technology: Industry Sensors II—Let's Organize Data


Program Organizers:
Thomas W. Pelletiers, Kymera International
Blaine Stebick, Phoenix Sintered Metals LLC
William R. Gasbarre, FAPMI, Gasbarre Products, Inc.
Daniel P. Reardon, Abbott Furnace Company







The ability to control processes is directly related to monitoring the variables driving the process. In PM, temperature, velocity, flow, position, pressure, and force are all examples of data critical to the quality of product produced. Developments in sensors monitoring and controlling various processes in the PM industry are explored defining current state-of-the-art, emerging new technology, and the architecture used to deliver this data to enterprise wide information systems. Combining the data can enable real time decisions improving quality, efficiency, accuracy, and delivery.

Session Chairman: William R. Gasbarre, FAPMI, Gasbarre Products, Inc.

180

USA

9:30 a.m.

Overview of Industrial Data Collection Systems
Larry Shindledecker,
Gasbarre Products, Inc.

179

USA

9:55 a.m.

I Have Data! Now What?
Jeffrey F. Chileski,
Abbott Furnace Company

190

USA

10:20 a.m.

Smart Sensors
J.J. Thiara,
Rockwell Automation

 

SPECIAL INTEREST PROGRAM

Wednesday Morning

11:00 a.m.–12:15 p.m.


SIP 3-3
Machinery Sensors and Information Technology: Industry Sensors III—Impacting Business Operations with My Data


Program Organizers:
Thomas W. Pelletiers, Kymera International
Blaine Stebick, Phoenix Sintered Metals LLC
William R. Gasbarre, FAPMI, Gasbarre Products, Inc.
Daniel P. Reardon, Abbott Furnace Company







The ability to control processes is directly related to monitoring the variables driving the process. In PM, temperature, velocity, flow, position, pressure, and force are all examples of data critical to the quality of product produced. Developments in sensors monitoring and controlling various processes in the PM industry are explored defining current state-of-the-art, emerging new technology, and the architecture used to deliver this data to enterprise wide information systems. Combining the data can enable real time decisions improving quality, efficiency, accuracy, and delivery.

Session Chairman: Daniel P. Reardon, Abbott Furnace Company

188

USA

11:00 a.m.

A Platform for Data Science Applications to Industrial Processes Part I
Dilsat Kalkiran,
SAP America

202

USA

11:25 a.m.

A Platform for Data Science Applications to Industrial Processes Part II
Dilsat Dalkiran,
SAP America

205

USA

11:50 a.m.

Industry 4.0 and Big Data: The Signal and the Noise
Steven R. Schmid,
University of Notre Dame